Results of long-term study could help identify children at risk of future type 2 diabetes

Diabetes.co.uk| January 2020 | Results of long-term study could help identify children at risk of future type 2 diabetes

University of Plymouth & Nestle researchers have identified biological and physiological factors which lead to the development of type 2 diabetes in adults. 

The EarlyBird cohort study followed 300 healthy children in Plymouth,  for 15 years to determine who would become at risk of developing type 2 diabetes, and why. The findings have been published in the journal Diabetes Care 

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Jon Pinkney, Professor of Endocrinology and Diabetes in the University of Plymouth’s Peninsula Medical School and Honorary Consultant Physician in Endocrinology and Diabetes at University Hospitals Plymouth NHS Trust said:

“The rapidly rising prevalence of type 2 diabetes is one of the biggest global health challenges, and there is an urgent need to develop effective strategies for early intervention and prevention.

“The research partnership between University of Plymouth and Nestlé has shown how the risks of future type 2 diabetes can be predicted in childhood. This opens up the possibility of individualised advice and early intervention to reduce the risks of future type 2 diabetes.” (Source: University of Plymouth)

The press release from University of Plymouth also provides more information on the EarlyBird study, available here 

The abstract is available from Diabetes Care but for the full contact the Library & Knowledge Service 

University of Plymouth Results of long-term study could help identify children at risk of future type 2 diabetes

Related:

Diabetes.co.uk Genetic link to identify children at risk of type 2 diabetes

 

The effect of health lifestyle habits on life expectancy and type 2 diabetes

Li, Y. | 2020  |Healthy lifestyle and life expectancy free of cancer, cardiovascular disease, and type 2 diabetes: prospective cohort study | BMJ |368|  doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.l6669

A new cohort study uses data from the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) and 28 years of follow-up in the Health Professions Follow-up Study (HPFS) to look at the impact of habits on lifestyle, the team behind the research examine the effect of healthy lifestyle factors on life expectancy free of cancer, cardiovascular disease, and type 2 diabetes. Participants of both studies completed questionnaires about their diet, exercise, smoking status, and other factors (questions on the use of postmenopausal hormone replacement therapies and reproduction related questions were asked in the NHS only). Data on their age, ethnicity, and family history (either presence or absence) was also collected about diabetes, cancer, or myocardial infarction (in first degree relatives)- this was collected via biennial questionnaires. 

Their observations suggest that a healthier lifestyle was associated with a lower risk of cancer, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes as well as mortality, with an increased total life expectancy and number of years lived free of these diseases (Source: Li et al, 2020).

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Abstract

Objective To examine how a healthy lifestyle is related to life expectancy that is free from major chronic diseases.

Design Prospective cohort study.

Setting and participants The Nurses’ Health Study (1980-2014; n=73 196) and the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study (1986-2014; n=38 366).

Main exposures Five low risk lifestyle factors: never smoking, body mass index 18.5-24.9, moderate to vigorous physical activity (less than or equal to 30 minutes/day), moderate alcohol intake (women: 5-15 g/day; men 5-30 g/day), and a higher diet quality score (upper 40%).

Main outcome Life expectancy free of diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer.

Results The life expectancy free of diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer at age 50 was 23.7 years (95% confidence interval 22.6 to 24.7) for women who adopted no low risk lifestyle factors, in contrast to 34.4 years (33.1 to 35.5) for women who adopted four or five low risk factors. At age 50, the life expectancy free of any of these chronic diseases was 23.5 (22.3 to 24.7) years among men who adopted no low risk lifestyle factors and 31.1 (29.5 to 32.5) years in men who adopted four or five low risk lifestyle factors. For current male smokers who smoked heavily (more than or equal to 15 cigarettes/day) or obese men and women (body mass index more than or equal to 30), their disease-free life expectancies accounted for the lowest proportion (less than or equal to 75%) of total life expectancy at age 50.

Conclusion Adherence to a healthy lifestyle at mid-life is associated with a longer life expectancy free of major chronic diseases.

Read the full article at the  BMJ

In the news:

BBC News Healthy habits ‘deliver extra disease-free decade’