Covid-19: diabetes clinicians set up social media account to help alleviate patients’ fears

BMJ (2020). Covid-19: diabetes clinicians set up social media account to help alleviate patients’ fears. 368.m1262  doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.m1262  

A news piece in the BMJ explains how a group of diabetes doctors and other clinicians has set up a social media account to help alleviate patients’ fears around covid-19 and provide them with “a secure base” of information. The Twitter account uses the handle @_diabetes101

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BMJ Covid-19: diabetes clinicians set up social media account to help alleviate patients’ fears

 

 

 

 

Detecting type 2 diabetes in the dentist’s chair

Diabetes UK | March 2020 |Detecting type 2 diabetes in the dentist’s chair

A new systematic review reports how dental teams could be integral in helping to identify individuals who may be at high risk of diabetes, for instance those who exhibit prediabetes,  (non-diabetic hyperglycaemia (NDH ); as well as those who are undiagnosed. The researchers from the University of Birmingham through the use of risk assessment tools, questionnaires with patients and blood testing at the dental surgery could improve health outcomes for people at risk of type 2 diabetes.

dentist-appontment-3881449Lead researcher Professor Iain Chapple, Head of the University of Birmingham’s School of Dentistry said: Our review identified positive attitudes of physicians, dental team members, patients and the public towards risk assessing and early case detection of diabetes and prediabetes within the dental surgery. Patients also strongly supported tests being undertaken that provided immediate results.

“Not only does this demonstrate that there may be benefit in engaging the dental workforce to identify these cases, but also shows a need for a more joined up approach to care pathways between physicians and dental practitioners.”

The researchers have said that further investigation is needed to figure out how best to engage the dental workers, and whether it is a cost-effective way to optimise protocols and patient care pathways.

The review follows earlier research which suggested that  severe periodontitis, a condition that involves inflammation of the gums, and gum disease are linked to type 2 diabetes (Source: Diabetes.co.uk)

See also:

University of Birmingham [press release] Research identifies potentially important role for dental teams in early detection of Type 2 and pre-diabetes

The Role of the Oral Healthcare Team in Identification of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review

 

 

Patient-reported improvement in pain with pregabalin for painful diabetic neuropathy and postherpetic neuralgia is promising but needs further investigation

Cox, F. | March 2020 | Patient-reported improvement in pain with pregabalin for painful diabetic neuropathy and postherpetic neuralgia is promising but needs further investigation

Pregabalin is licensed to treat neuropathic pain which is defined as pain caused by a lesion or disease of the somatosensory nervous system. Neuropathic pain effects up to 10% of the population and includes postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) and painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN). The impact can be disabling and lead to higher healthcare utilisation. Current guidance from the National Institute for Healthcare and Excellence  for the pharmacological management of neuropathic pain offers a choice of pregabalin, gabapentin, amitriptyline or duloxetine as initial treatment while in Scotland, pregabalin is second-line therapy for peripheral neuropathic pain. A previous Cochrane review explored the use of pregabalin in acute and chronic pain.

The author of the commentary writes, here is moderate quality evidence that pregabalin is more effective than placebo for postherpetic neuralgia, painful diabetic neuropathy and post-traumatic neuropathic pain.

Full commentary available from BMJ Evidence Based Nursing

Draft report on low-carb diets for adults with type-2 diabetes

Public Health England | March 2020 | Draft report on low-carb diets for adults with type-2 diabetes

The Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition (SACN) publishes consultation on its draft report on lower carbohydrate diets for people with type 2 diabetes.

The effect of lower compared to higher carbohydrate diets were considered on a range of outcomes including body weight and measures of blood glucose concentrations.

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Following a robust, systematic assessment of the available evidence, the draft conclusions are:

  • for body weight, there is no difference between lower and higher carbohydrate diets in the long-term (at or beyond 12 months). Short term weight change was not considered
  • for blood glucose (sugar) levels, lower carbohydrate diets may have benefits over higher carbohydrate diets in the short term, but their longer-term effects are unclear

Current UK government advice (represented by the Eatwell Guide) is that for the general population, around 50% of total dietary energy should be from starchy carbohydrates (such as potatoes, bread and rice), opting for higher fibre or wholegrain versions where possible. People with type 2 diabetes are currently advised to follow healthy eating advice for the general population.

This is based on recommendations made by SACN following its 2015 review of the evidence on carbohydrates and health.

Dr Adrienne Cullum, head of nutrition science at Public Health England PHE, said:

The Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition, with support from a range of partners including Diabetes UK and NHSE, have undertaken a thorough review of the evidence on low-carb diets for adults with type-2 diabetes.

SACN is consulting on the draft report to make sure it has considered all the relevant evidence, and to invite comments on the draft conclusions. All comments on the draft report are welcome (Source: PHE).

Full release available from Public Health England

Should a chronic condition, such as type 1 diabetes, prevent regular exercise?

NICE |nd| Should a chronic condition, such as type 1 diabetes, prevent regular exercise?

In the latest episode of NICE’S podcast NICE Talks, the topic is whether a long term chronic condition such as type 1 diabetes should prevent regular exercise.

The hosts of the podcast speak with Chris Bright, a Welsh International Futsal player, who has lived with type 1 diabetes for 20 years; Professor Partha Kar a Consultant Endocrinologist at Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust and aNational Specialty Advisor, Diabetes, for NHS England; and chiropractor Peter Dixon, President of the Royal College of Chiropractors and NICE Fellow. They discuss the NICE recommendations on physical activity for those with type 1 diabetes, available from NICE.

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Listen via Soundcloud