Prescribing for Diabetes – England 2015/16 to 2020/21

NHSBSA | August 2021 | Prescribing for Diabetes – England 2015/16 to 2020/21

 This publication from the NHS Business Services Authority aims to describe the prescribing of medicines and appliances used for the treatment of diabetes in a primary care setting in England that are dispensed in the community

Key findings:

  • in 2020/21, there were 57.9 million drugs used in treating diabetes prescribed in England for a cost of £1.19 billion, 12.5% of the total spend on all prescription items prescribed in England. This was an increase from 2015/16 where 49.7 million diabetes items were prescribed in England for a cost of £958 million, representing 10.4% of the total spend on all prescriptions items.
  • antidiabetic drugs were the most prescribed drugs used in treating diabetes in England in 2020/21 with 43.1 million items at a cost of £686 million. The costs of antidiabetic drugs have increased by 62% since 2015/16 from £423 million.
  • there were 3.05 million identified patients that were prescribed drugs used in diabetes in England in 2020/21. This was a 1.5% increase from 3 million identified patients in 2015/16, and a 12.7% increase from 2.70 million in 2015/16.
  • the median age of identified patients for drugs used in diabetes was 64 in 2020/21, this has remained consistent since 2015/16. The most common age group in 2020/21 was 70 to 74, this has increased from 2015/16 where the most common age group was 65 to 69.
  • areas of greater deprivation have the highest number of identified patients being prescribed drugs used in treating diabetes in 2020/21, with the number of patients receiving prescribing in the most deprived areas of England being 264% of the least deprived areas

Can DNA-based diets improve blood sugar levels in people at high risk of type 2? New study needs participants to find out the answer

Diabetes UK | August 2021 | Can DNA-based diets improve blood sugar levels in people at high risk of type 2?

Adult over 18 with prediabetes could help contribute to research to test a new type of diet that might improve blood sugar levels and potentially prevent the development of type 2 diabetes in this population. The new diet is tailored to a person’s particular genetic makeup- a DNA-based diet.

Researchers at Imperial College are looking for participants who will be randomised to three different groups: one group will receive special dietary guidelines via an app and wearable wristband or via a dietitian, or usual care which is standard dietary advice for people at risk of developing type 2 diabetes the study will run for 26 weeks.

Further information is available from Diabetes UK
 

COVID-19 and peripheral arterial complications in people with diabetes and hypertension: A systematic review #Covid19RftLks

Rastogi, A., Dogra, H. & Jude, E.B | 2021| COVID-19 and peripheral arterial complications in people with diabetes and hypertension: A systematic review| Diabetes Metab Syndr| | 15 | 5 | 102204. doi: 10.1016/j.dsx.2021.102204. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 34303918; PMCID: PMC8266514.

COVID-19 is a unique thrombo-inflammatory condition and patients with background diabetes or hypertension are more susceptible for lower limb complications due to peripheral arterial disease presenting as gangrene. The authors conducted a systematic review of the reported cases of peripheral gangrene in COVID-19 patients, co-existing comorbidities, specific treatment given, and outcomes of limb amputations or death.

COVID-19 and peripheral arterial complications in people with diabetes and hypertension: A systematic review [primary paper]

The impact of COVID-19 on the physical activity and sedentary behaviour levels of pregnant women with gestational diabetes #Covid19RftLks

Hillyard, M., Sinclair, M., Murphy, M., Casson, K. & Mulligan, C. | 2021 | The impact of COVID-19 on the physical activity and sedentary behaviour levels of pregnant women with gestational diabetes | PLoS ONE | 16 | 8 | e0254364. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0254364

The authors’ objective was to understand how COVID-19 has affected the self-reported physical activity and sedentary behaviour levels of pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). To this end they surveyed over 500 participants using an online survey to gauge levels of physical activity and sedentary behaviour in this population.

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a considerable impact on the activity levels of pregnant women with gestational diabetes and for the researchers of this study, highlights the need for targeted public health initiatives. In their paper they underline that the findings of their study will help policy makers and health service providers to understand how best to support pregnant women during subsequent waves of COVID-19 or future pandemics or situations requiring lockdown.

Abstract

Background

The aim of this study was to understand how physical activity and sedentary behaviour levels of pregnant women with gestational diabetes in the UK have been affected by COVID-19.

Methods

An online survey exploring physical activity and sedentary behaviour levels of pregnant women with gestational diabetes during COVID-19 was distributed through social media platforms. Women who had been pregnant during the COVID-19 outbreak and had gestational diabetes, were resident in the UK, were 18 years old or over and could understand written English were invited to take part.

Results

A total of 724 women accessed the survey, 553 of these met the eligibility criteria and took part in the survey. Sedentary time increased for 79 per cent of the women during the pandemic. Almost half of the women (47 per cent) were meeting the physical activity guidelines pre COVID-19 during their pregnancy, this dropped to 23 per cent during the COVID-19 pandemic. Fear of leaving the house due to COVID-19 was the most commonly reported reason for the decline. Significant associations were found between meeting the physical activity guidelines during COVID-19 and educational attainment, fitness equipment ownership and knowledge of how to exercise safely in pregnancy.

Conclusions and implications

These results show the impact of COVID-19 on physical activity and sedentary behaviour levels and highlight the need for targeted public health initiatives as the pandemic continues and for future lockdowns. Women with gestational diabetes need to know how it is safe and beneficial to them to engage in physical activity and ways to do this from their homes if fear of leaving the house due to COVID-19 is a barrier for them. Online physical activity classes provided by certified trainers in physical activity for pregnant women may help them remain active when face-to-face appointments are reduced and limited additional resources are available.

The impact of COVID-19 on the physical activity and sedentary behaviour levels of pregnant women with gestational diabetes [primary paper]

New reports from Healthcare Quality Improvement Partnership

The following new resources have been published on the HQIP website:

National Diabetes Audit 2019-2020. Report 1: Care processes and treatment targets

The National Diabetes Audit, which provides a comprehensive view of diabetes care in England and Wales, has published its report into care processes and treatment targets. Based on data from 98 specialist services in England and Wales, the report is designed to measure the effectiveness of diabetes healthcare against NICE Clinical Guidelines and Quality Standards.

Read the full report here

National Diabetes Audit 2019-2020: Type 1 Diabetes

The National Diabetes Audit, which provides a comprehensive view of diabetes care in England and Wales, has published its first Type 1 Diabetes report. Based on data collected from 98 specialist services in England and Wales from January 2019 to 31 March 2020, the report details the findings and recommendations relating to diabetes care process completion, treatment target achievement and education for people Type 1 diabetes.

Read the full report here

Young People with Type 2 Diabetes, 2019-2020

The National Diabetes Audit and the National Paediatric Diabetes Audit, which provide a comprehensive view of diabetes care in England and Wales, have published their first Young People with Type 2 Diabetes report. Based on data collected from England between January 2019 and March 2020, the report aims to document the number of young people with Type 2 diabetes up to the age of 40, their characteristics and the diabetes care they receive.

Read the full report here