Multimorbidity: a priority for global health research

This report was undertaken to summarise the existing research evidence about the burden, determinants, prevention, and treatment of multimorbidity | The Academy of Medical Sciences

multi
Image source: acmedsci.ac.uk

The term multimorbidity  refers to the existence of multiple medical conditions in a single individual. For many regions of the world, there is evidence that a substantial, and likely growing, proportion of the adult population is affected by more than one chronic condition.

Health conditions that frequently group together include heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes, cancer, depression, anxiety, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and chronic kidney disease.  Why this happens is poorly understood, making it difficult to predict which patients may be most in need of preventive or increased care.

The report also highlights how physical conditions, such as type 2 diabetes, can affect mental health, and vice versa. But the division between health services treating mental and physical health often means that patients with physical and mental conditions are at particular risk of poor care.

Full report: Multimorbidity: a priority for global health research | The Academy of Medical Sciences.

See also:

Impact of chronic diseases on cancer risk

Several common chronic diseases together account for more than a fifth of new cancer cases and more than a third of cancer deaths| BMJ | via ScienceDaily

Findings from research published in the BMJ show that the cancer risks from common chronic diseases, such as heart disease and diabetes, are as important as those from five major lifestyle factors combined.

A team of researchers  investigated the combined effect of eight common chronic diseases or disease markers on cancer risk compared with lifestyle factors. Among the conditions evaluated were cardiovascular disease, diabetes, chronic kidney disease, pulmonary disease, and gouty arthritis.

The researchers found that cardiovascular disease markers, diabetes, chronic kidney disease markers, pulmonary disease, and gouty arthritis marker were individually associated with risk of developing cancer or cancer death.

Together, these chronic diseases and markers accounted for more than one fifth of all new cancers and more than one third of all cancer deaths in this study population, which was similar to the contribution of five major lifestyle risk factors combined — smoking, insufficient physical activity, insufficient fruit and vegetable intake, alcohol consumption, and obesity.

The researchers also found that physical activity was associated with a nearly 40% reduction in the excess risks of cancer and cancer death associated with chronic diseases and markers.

However, the authors point out that chronic diseases are not targeted in current cancer prevention strategies — and say their findings have important implications for developing new strategies that target chronic diseases.

Full detail at ScienceDaily

Full reference: Huakang Tu et al. |  Cancer risk associated with chronic diseases and disease markers: prospective cohort study | BMJ 2018