Free 10 week get moving course for people with diabetes

Diabetes UK | 01 April 2021| Sign up to our free ‘get moving’ classes

Starting in May, Diabetes UK ‘sPhysical Activity Coordinators will be running free 10 week courses specifically tailored to support people who are currently doing less than 30 minutes of exercise a week. 

From boxercise to Tai chi to movement to music, each weekly class will focus on a different gentle activity – giving you the chance to try out new ways to get active and find what suits you. Plus, we’ll be holding Q&A sessions at the end of each class, so that you can find out more about managing your condition and get tips and advice from our clinical experts and guest speakers. 

And because you’ll be part of the same group throughout the entire 10 weeks, you’ll also get the chance to meet and chat to other participants who all have the same goal – to move more and live well with diabetes.

The majority of our Get Moving courses will be held online, so you’ll just need to be able to log in via Zoom to take part. As all 10 classes will be held on the same day and time each week, we’ve got a number of courses running at different times throughout the week for you to choose from – including evenings and the weekend. 

Diabetes UK will also be running specific online courses for: 

  • women only
  • South Asian communities with translation
  • those wanting to do chair-based activities only. 

Simply register your interest to find out more about our time slots and availability, and we’ll be in touch with more details as soon as possible. 

Full details from Diabetes UK

Should a chronic condition, such as type 1 diabetes, prevent regular exercise?

NICE |nd| Should a chronic condition, such as type 1 diabetes, prevent regular exercise?

In the latest episode of NICE’S podcast NICE Talks, the topic is whether a long term chronic condition such as type 1 diabetes should prevent regular exercise.

The hosts of the podcast speak with Chris Bright, a Welsh International Futsal player, who has lived with type 1 diabetes for 20 years; Professor Partha Kar a Consultant Endocrinologist at Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust and aNational Specialty Advisor, Diabetes, for NHS England; and chiropractor Peter Dixon, President of the Royal College of Chiropractors and NICE Fellow. They discuss the NICE recommendations on physical activity for those with type 1 diabetes, available from NICE.

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Listen via Soundcloud

Physical activity reduces mortality in patients with diabetes

New research suggests patients with type 2 diabetes should be prescribed physical activity to control blood sugar and improve heart health | European Association of Preventive Cardiology | via ScienceDaily

Patients with type 2 diabetes should be prescribed physical activity to control blood sugar and improve heart health. That is one of the recommendations in a position paper of the European Association of Preventive Cardiology (EAPC), a branch of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). The paper is published in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a journal of the ESC.

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One in 11 adults worldwide have diabetes, of which 90% is type 2 diabetes. Nearly all patients with type 2 diabetes develop cardiovascular complications, which are the leading causes of death in this group.

The paper provides practical recommendations for doctors on how to motivate patients to incorporate physical activity into their daily routine, set achievable and measurable goals, and design individualised exercise training programmes to meet those goals.

Full story at ScienceDaily

Journal reference: Kemps, H. et al. | Exercise training for patients with type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease: What to pursue and how to do it. A Position Paper of the European Association of Preventive Cardiology (EAPC) |  European Journal of Preventive Cardiology | January 14th 2019

Physical activity reduces mortality in patients with diabetes

Science Daily | January 2019 | Physical activity reduces mortality in patients with diabetes

A new paper published in the European Journal of Caridology recommends that people with diabetes should be prescribed physical activity to control their blood sugar and improve their heart health (via Science Daily).

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The article provides practical recommendations for doctors on how to motivate patients to incorporate physical activity into their daily routine, set achievable and measurable goals, and design individualised exercise training programmes to meet those goals.  Recommendations relate to physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF); glycaemic control; vascular function; and dyslipidaemia.

The lead author of the paper, Dr  Hareld Kemps said: “Just advising patients to exercise, which is what doctors typically do, is not enough,” said Dr Kemps. “Patients must be assessed for comorbidities, risks related to exercise, and personal preferences. This will be cost effective in the long run so we have to wake up policy makers and healthcare insurers to pay for it. That needs clinicians to take the lead and call for programmes to be reimbursed.”

“I can’t stress enough how effective even small increases in activity can benefit patients with type 2 diabetes and heart problems. Interrupting sitting with brief bouts of walking improves glucose control, while two hours of brisk walking per week reduces the risk of further heart problems.”

He advises patients to consult their own doctor for a personalised plan.

Science Daily Physical activity reduces mortality in patients with diabetes

Full reference:

Kemps, H. et al  |2019| Exercise training for patients with type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease: What to pursue and how to do it. A Position Paper of the European Association of Preventive Cardiology (EAPC)| European Journal of Preventive Cardiology| https://doi.org/10.1177/2047487318820420

Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus suffer from dysregulation of a plethora of cardiovascular and metabolic functions, including dysglycaemia, dyslipidaemia, arterial hypertension, obesity and a reduced cardiorespiratory fitness. Exercise training has the potential to improve many of these functions, such as insulin sensitivity, lipid profile, vascular reactivity and cardiorespiratory fitness, particularly in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with cardiovascular comorbidities, such as patients that suffered from an acute myocardial infarction, or after a coronary intervention such as percutaneous coronary intervention or coronary artery bypass grafting. The present position paper aims to provide recommendations for prescription of exercise training in patients with both type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. The first part discusses the relevance and practical applicability of treatment targets that may be pursued, and failure to respond to these targets. The second part provides recommendations on the contents and methods to prescribe exercise training tailored to these treatment targets as well as to an optimal preparation and dealing with barriers and risks specific to type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiac comorbidity.

The article is available to read and download from the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology

Couch potato habits are more harmful if family members have type 2 diabetes

University of Liverpool  | March 2018  |  Sedentary lifestyles ‘more harmful’ if type 2 diabetes in the family

A new study emphasises how beneficial physical exercise can be for those with a familial history of Type 2 diabetes. Although earlier research has suggested that physical inactivity can have harmful effects on the body, this research advances previous  findings, by suggesting these effects could be even greater if there is a family history of Type 2 diabetes.

Researcher Dr Kelly Bowden Davies, from Liverpool University’s Institute of Ageing and Chronic Disease, conducted the study with a team of researchers, said: “The results of our study highlight the critical importance of avoiding low levels of physical activity and sedentary behaviour, for example too much sitting, television viewing, computer gaming and so on. We know the benefits of exercise, the challenge now is to encourage people to simply move more and sit less.”

The research which was funded by Diabetes UK,  looked at 45 individuals with an average age of 36, who were physically active,  that is they all walked at least 10,000 steps a day.  A  third of the sample (16) had a close relative with a diagnosis of Type 2 diabetes.  Initially, the participants reduced their physical activity for two weeks, which included driving, rather than walking, and using lifts or escalators instead of stairs to limit the number of steps to around 1,500 a day.  Participant’s leisure time was spent at home, mainly watching TV or playing computer games.

Following this period of relative inactivity,  the researchers found that all of the sample  had higher levels of fat and their bodies were less able to respond to the hormone, insulin (known as insulin resistance) than at the outset.  Equally, following an additional fortnight’s observation, this time the participant’s resumed their more active lifestyles, they were assessed again and the researchers found the adverse effects were reversed.

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For the research team, this underlines how beneficial physical activity can be, and the important role it plays in reducing the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes.

Dr Elizabeth Robertson, Director of Research at Diabetes UK, said: “This Diabetes UK study sheds light on the potential harmful effects that short-term inactivity could have on our health, especially if we have a close family history of Type 2 diabetes.

“People with Type 2 diabetes in the family are two to six times more likely to develop the condition than those who do not have a family history of the condition. Living an active lifestyle and eating a healthy balanced diet are the key ways to reduce your risk of Type 2 diabetes.”

The full news item is available from University of Liverpool

Sedentary lifestyles ‘more harmful’ if type 2 diabetes in the family

In the media:

The Telegraph Just two weeks of sedentary office working risks diabetes – new report

Diet and exercise programmes can prevent diabetes in high-risk individuals

This systematic review compares the long-term impact of different prevention strategies to better guide national diabetes prevention programmes. | JAMA Internal Medicine | via National Institute for Health Research

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This review combines international data from over 40 trials looking at the long-term impact of medication and lifestyle modification compared with control. Findings support current NICE recommendations:  Lifestyle change programmes, targeting both diet and exercise, should continue to be promoted as a central component of care to reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes in high-risk individuals.

Key Findings:

  • At the end of treatment (average 2.6 years) lifestyle modification reduced risk of diabetes by about 40%. Diabetes developed in around seven per 100 people per year following combined diet and physical activity strategies compared with 11 per 100 controls. Overall 25 people would be needed to be treated to prevent one case of diabetes.
  • Medication also reduced risk of diabetes at the end of the treatment period (average 3.1 years). Weight loss drugs like orlistat gave the highest overall risk reduction, followed by certain diabetes drugs including metformin.  An overall risk reduction of 36% was found across all medication studies, though this included three lifestyle-plus-medication studies. There were five cases of diabetes per 100 people taking medication per year compared with nine per 100 controls. Overall 25 people would need treatment to prevent one case of diabetes.
  • Four studies considered the effect of lifestyle modification at later follow-up (average 7.2 years). Three were diet and physical activity interventions, and one trial looked at a reduced-fat diet alone. Overall the risk of diabetes was 28% lower at follow-up compared to controls. This had decreased from a 45% risk reduction at the end of active treatment in the same studies.
  • Six studies found no sustained effect of various medicines at longer follow-up ranging from two to 52 weeks after treatment completion.

Further detail at NIHR

Full reference: Haw JS, et al. | Long-term sustainability of diabetes prevention approaches: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials. | JAMA Internal Medicine |2017 177(12):1808-17.

Physical exercise may lower risk of developing diabetes in high risk individuals

University of Birmingham scientists in conjunction with Chinese researchers, studied  the incidence of  type 2 diabetes in a prospective cohort study of Chinese adults with impaired fasting glucose (IFG).44 828. The adults age range was between 20-80 years with newly detected IFG but free from cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease were recruited and followed their health from 1996 to 2014.

The researchers  found an association between individuals who engage in physical activity and lower risk of diabetes, in people who have a high risk of developing the condition.  Studying an IFG population in Taiwan, compared with inactive participants, diabetes risk in individuals reporting low, moderate and high volume  leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) was reduced by 12%, 20%, and 25% respectively after adjusting for physical labour at work and other factors.

The researchers found that 19.2% of diabetes cases could have been avoided if the inactive participants had engaged in WHO recommendation levels of LTPA.

Full story from Science Daily 
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Abstract

Aims To evaluate the effects of habitual leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) on incident type 2 diabetes in a prospective cohort of Chinese adults with impaired fasting glucose (IFG).

Methods 44 828 Chinese adults aged 20–80 years with newly detected IFG but free from cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease were recruited and followed up from 1996 to 2014. Incident type 2 diabetes was identified by fasting plasma glucose ≥7 mmol/L. The participants were classified into four categories based on their self-reported weekly LTPA: inactive, low, moderate, or high. Hazard ratios (HRs) and population attributable fractions (PAFs) were estimated with adjustment for established diabetic risk factor.

Results After 214 148 person-years of follow-up, we observed an inverse dose–response relationship between LTPA and diabetes risk. Compared with inactive participants, diabetes risk in individuals reporting low, moderate and high volume LTPA were reduced by 12% (HR 0.88, 95% CI 0.80 to 0.99; P=0.015), 20% (HR 0.80, 95% CI 0.71 to 0.90; P less than 0.001), and 25% (HR 0.75, 95% CI 0.67 to 0.83; P less than 0.001), respectively. At least 19.2% (PAF 19.2%, 95% CI 5.9% to 30.6%) of incident diabetes cases could be avoided if the inactive participants had engaged in WHO recommendation levels of LTPA. This would correspond to a potential reduction of at least 7 million diabetic patients in the Greater China area.

Conclusions Our results show higher levels of LTPA are associated with a lower risk of diabetes in IFG subjects. These data emphasise the urgent need for promoting physical activity as a preventive strategy against diabetes to offset the impact of population ageing and the growing obesity epidemic.

Full reference: Xiang, Q.L. et al | Increased leisure-time physical activity associated with lower onset of diabetes in 44 828 adults with impaired fasting glucose: a population-based prospective cohort study | British Journal of Sports Medicine| 2018 |DOI: 10.1136/bjsports-2017-098199

The full text article can be requested by Rotherham NHS staff here