Mindfulness in Relation to Diet Quality in Adults with Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes: Results from Diabetes MILES-The Netherlands

Liu, S. et al | 2021| Mindfulness in Relation to Diet Quality in Adults with Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes: Results from Diabetes MILES-The Netherlands| Mindfulness | https://doi.org/10.1007/s12671-021-01754-x

The objective of this research was to investigate the associations between dispositional mindfulness and diet quality in Dutch adults with type 1 diabetes (T1DM) or type 2 diabetes (T2DM). They hypothesized that a higher level of mindfulness is related to greater diet quality. In the light of previous research in other populations (Sala et al., 2020), they theorised that each mindfulness facet is positively associated with diet quality. In addition, they evaluated the potential mediating role of emotional distress in these associations.

The researchers found that a higher level of dispositional mindfulness and a higher score on observing were associated with higher diet quality. The results were more robust in people with T1DM. Their findings also suggest that overall mindfulness and the facet of observing are associated with higher diet quality in people with diabetes, independent of emotional distress.

They conclude that their findings suggest that mindfulness, especially observing facet, may relate to a healthier diet in adults with diabetes (Source: Liu et al, 2021).

The full paper is available to read from Mindfulness

One-year Follow-up of a Randomized Controlled Trial Piloting a Mindfulness-based Group Intervention for Adolescent Insulin Resistance

Shomaker, L. B. et al. |2019| One-year Follow-up of a Randomized Controlled Trial Piloting a Mindfulness-based Group Intervention for Adolescent Insulin Resistance|Frontiers in Psychology|10| 1040| doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2019.01040

A follow up to an RCT pilot that looked at the impact of a mindfulness-based intervention (MBI) on adolescent girls with overweight/ obesity at risk of developing type 2 diabetes;  finds that brief MBI may reduce insulin- resistance in this population (at-risk adolescents). 

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Introduction: To explore if a brief mindfulness-based intervention (MBI) leads to sustained, improved clinical outcomes in adolescents at-risk for type 2 diabetes (T2D).

Methods: Participants were 12-17y girls with overweight/obesity, elevated depression symptoms, and T2D family history participating in a randomized, controlled pilot trial of a six-session MBI versus cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) group. At baseline and one-year, mindfulness, depression, insulin resistance (IR), and body composition were assessed with validated instruments.

Results: One-year retention was 71% (n=12) in MBI; 81% (n=13) in CBT. At one-year, depression decreased (Cohen’s d=.68) and IR decreased (d=.73) in adolescents randomized to MBI compared to those in CBT. There were no significant between-condition differences in mindfulness, adiposity, or BMI.

Discussion: One-year outcomes from this randomized, controlled pilot trial suggest that brief MBI may reduce depression and IR in at-risk adolescents. Replication and exploration of mechanisms within the context of a larger clinical trial are necessary.

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Mindfulness emerged as a promising resilience factor in parents of children with T1D, resulting in less daily worries and protective parenting

Van Gampelaere, C., et al |2018|  Mindfulness, Worries, and Parenting in Parents of Children With Type 1 Diabetes| Journal of Pediatric Psychology| https://doi.org/10.1093/jpepsy/jsy094

An article published in the Journal of Pediatric Psychology sought to investigate parental mindfulness as a resilience mechanism for parents whose children have type 1 diabetes (T1D). According to the researchers mindfulness emerged as a promising resilience factor in parents of children with T1D, resulting in less daily worries and protective parenting. 

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Abstract

Objective

Parents of children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) often experience distress and worries, which may negatively impact their parenting behaviors. The current study investigates parental mindfulness (i.e., an enhanced attention to and awareness of current experiences or present reality) as a resilience mechanism. Using a daily diary approach, the predictive role of parental mindfulness for daily diabetes-related worries was examined, its impact upon protective parenting behaviors, and its buffering role in the relationship between daily worries and protective parenting behaviors.

 

Methods

Participants were 56 parents of 40 children with T1D (2–12 years). Trait mindfulness was assessed with the Mindful Attention Awareness Scale. Subsequently, parents completed a diary for 14 consecutive days, assessing parental worries about hypo- and hyperglycemia and general and diabetes-specific parental protective behavior.

 

Results

Multilevel analyses showed that parental diabetes-related worries fluctuated substantially across days and positively predicted daily protective behavior. Higher levels of parental mindfulness predicted less daily worries about hypoglycemia and lower engagement in general protective behavior and hypoglycemia avoidance behavior. In addition, the relationship between worries about hyperglycemia and general protective behavior was moderated by parental mindfulness.

 

Conclusions

The present findings highlight the importance of daily parental worries in explaining parental protective behaviors on a daily basis. Mindfulness emerged as a promising resilience factor in parents of children with T1D, resulting in less daily worries and protective parenting. These results have important clinical implications and point to the promising role of mindfulness interventions in this context.

 

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